The Hume Linear Algebra Tcl Package, La

 

Feature Summary

 

The package consists of Tcl procedures for the manipulation of vectors and matrices.  The functionality spans scaling, normalization, concatenation by rows or columns, subsetting by rows or columns, formatted printing, transpose, dot product, matrix multiplication, solution of linear equation sets, matrix inversion, eigenvalue/eigenvector solutions,  singular value decomposition, and solution of linear least squares.  The singular value decomposition can be used to perform the principle components analysis of multivariate statistical process control and avoid the possibly ill-conditioned multiplication of the XXt  matrix of  observations.

 

The user can mix vectors and arrays in linear algebra operations.  The logic does reasonable conversion of types.  Sophisticated operations such as evaluating a custom procedure against each element of a matrix are easily possible.  Data is represented as ordinary Tcl list variables so that the usual commands of Tcl are useable, and efficient access to the data elements using compiled extensions is possible.

 

This document and the package are ©Copyright 2001, Hume Integration Services.  You may use the package without licensing fees according to the License Terms.

User Guide

 

Obtaining the Package

 

The package may be obtained from the webpage http://www.hume.com/la.  The package uses the "string is" Tcl command which was new with Tcl 8.1.  So unless you are comfortable making minor changes to the Tcl source code, you should only use the package with Tcl version 8.1 and newer.  The version 1.0 package only consists of text files, there are no binary files.  The only difference between the Windows archive and the POSIX archive is the difference in line feed / carriage return characters at the end of each line of text.  The package is distributed as zip archives.  You are expected to use your own software to unpack the archive files. 

Installation

 

The package is installed by extracting from the zip archive file, the package directory and files.  The package directory should be added into the base directory of the Tcl runtime libraries.  So if your Tcl runtime library directory is /usr/local/lib/tcl8.3, copy or extract the la1.0 directory and files to /usr/local/lib so that you have the directory /usr/local/lib/la1.0 and the package files are found as /usr/local/lib/la1.0/*.* .  The Tcl code should be compatible with Tcl version 8.1 and later for any architecture, but we have only tested it with Tcl 8.3.   You can run the package regression tests by navigating to the package directory and sourcing the file “la.test”.

 

Runtime Usage

 

The software is found and made useable by your Tcl/Tk interpreter after you execute “package require La”.  You typically import the package procedure names into your global namespace to save yourself from having to qualify the procedure names using the package name.  So typical initialization code looks like:

 

% package require La

1.0

% namespace import La::*

 

Operand Formats

The package uses ordinary Tcl variables to represent scalars, vectors, and arrays.  This means that the ordinary Tcl commands are useable.  For example, the Tcl set command can be used to copy a matrix:

 

set A [mident 5]  ;# A is assigned a 5x5 identity matrix

set B $A          ;# B is assigned the value of A

 

Tcl list formats are used for better performance than arrays and for better compatibility with C/C++ code.   Dimension information is added in a simple way at the front of the list, for vectors, matrices, and higher dimensional variables.

 

Scalar Format 

If the list length of a variable is 1 the operand is a scalar, eg., "6.02e23".  The Tcl command llength can be used to determine the list length.

Vector Format

 

A vector of length N has the representation as a Tcl list of:

 

2 N 0 v[0] v[1] v[2] ... v[N-1]

 

The first element in the list, the value 2, signifies that there are two additional elements of size information; the number of rows, and the number of columns.  When the number of columns is 0, the operand is defined to be a one dimensional vector.  So the Tcl list sequence of {2 4 0 1 2 3 4} represents the vector {1 2 3 4}.  A vector of length N has the same number of elements as an Nx1 or 1xN matrix so they can be efficiently converted in place, and indexing operations are simplified.

 

The index into the underlying Tcl list for vector v[i] is

 

set index [expr {3 + $i}]

 

A vector of length N is promoted to an N rows by 1 column matrix if used in an operation where a matrix argument is expected.

 

The transpose of a vector of length N is a 1 row by N columns matrix.

Matrix Format

 

The Tcl list data used to represent two dimensional matrix a[R,C], has the format:

 

2 R C a[0,0] a[0,1] a[0,2] ... a[0,C-1] \

a[1,0] a[1,1] ... a[1,C-1] \

... a[R-1,C-1] 

 

where R is the number of rows, and C is the number of columns, and the backslash character has been used to indicate that the multiple lines of text constitute a single list sequence.  The format itself is independent of whether the user thinks that indexing starts from 0 or 1.  In Tcl, indexing of lists always starts with 0 so we have chosen to consistently start indexing with 0.

 

For a valid matrix, both the number of rows and the number of columns are positive integers.  The data elements following the {2 R C} dimension information can also be thought of as first row, second row, …, last row.  The index into the underlying Tcl list for a[i,j] is:

 

set index [expr {3 + $i * $C + $j}]

 

Higher Dimensions

 

If the first element in a Tcl list is > 2, the package assumes the list represents a higher dimensional operand.  Logic for higher dimension operands is not currently part of the package. 

 

The candidate structure for 3-D data is:

 

3 P R C a[0,0,0] a[0,0,1] a[0,0,2] ... a[0,0,C-1] ... a[P-1,R-1,C-1]

 

where P=planes, R=rows, C=columns.  An intuitive view is that the data is multiple 2-D planes of rows and columns listed in order from the 0 plane to the P-1 plane. 

 

The index into the underlying Tcl list for a[i,j,k] is

 

set index [expr 4 + $i*$R*$c + $j*$c + $k]

 

Operand Examples

 

set pi 3.1415            ;# a scalar

set v {2 1 0 3.1415}    ;# v[1] with value 3.1415

# vectors should use the first dimension of 2

set v {2 0 1 3.1415}    ;# error - vector should use first dimension only

set v {2 3 0 1 2 3 4}   ;# error - vector has an additional element

set m {2 2 3 1 2 3 4 5 6}  ;# m[2,3]

show $m

1 2 3

4 5 6

show [transpose $m]

1 4

2 5

3 6

 

Argument Passing By Value and By Reference

There are typically two procedures defined for an algorithm.  A plainly named procedure such as "transpose", and another procedure with the suffix _br such as "transpose_br".  The plainly named procedures expect their data arguments to be passed by value, which is the usual argument passing convention with Tcl programming.  The plain calls are designed for ease of interactive use, and in general have been coded to perform more conversion of arguments, more error checking, and to trade off efficiency for convenience.  The _br procedures are intended for efficent use, with the _br indicating that data arguments are passed "By Reference" to avoid copying the data.  In Tcl, to pass by reference means that the caller has the data in a named variable, and the caller passes the name of the variable instead of a copy of the data.  You can see that passing by reference is more efficient for larger vectors and arrays.  The _br procedures in general assume that the data arguments have the correct structure, so the caller may need to use the promote, demote, and transpose calls to prepare arguments for a _br call.

 

A Note on Performance

 

Number crunching in Tcl?  The conventional wisdom is that computationally intensive tasks such as numerical analysis are high on the list of things that you should not do in a scripting language.   It is true that you can obtain better performance using a traditional compiled language such as Fortran, or C code.   But nowadays, the performance gain that you will obtain by switching languages is similar to the performance gain you will see between a new computer and a computer from two years ago.   In many situations, the actual time spent processing numbers is a small portion of the overall project.  The time it takes the researcher to explore his data, decide on the desired approach, and develop the software for his desired analysis is the only performance time that really matters.   Here, a high-level development environment such as Tcl or MATLAB wins over C++ or Java hands down.   Actual performance numbers for the Tcl package are nothing to be ashamed about.   Using a 900Mhz Pentium III notebook computer, the following times were obtained for inverting an NxN matrix using Gauss elimination with partial pivoting.   This is something of a worst case since most numerical algorithms avoid the direct inversion of a full matrix.  Often a major performance improvement is made by choosing a better algorithm.

 

 

Inversion of an NxN matrix.

 

Development time for the following timed benchmark: 15 seconds.  It worked properly on the first attempt.  The flush and update commands are not needed except to show progress before completion.  The benchmark:

 

% source la.tcl

% namespace import La::*

% foreach n {10 20 50 100} {

   puts [time {msolve [mdingdong $n] [mident $n]}]

   flush stdout

   update

 }

Matrix Dimension (N)

Inversion Time (seconds)

10

0.020

20

0.140

50

1.973

100

15.43

 

Here are some tips for efficient coding.  In Tcl the expr command is used for the evaluation of numeric expressions.  You should almost always surround the arguments to expr with braces to prevent the Tcl interpreter from substituting the arguments.  The expr command itself is able to substitute variable references directly and avoid re-interpreting their string representation.  For example:

 

set index [expr {3 + $i * $C + $j}]   ;# good example

set index [expr 3 + $i*$C + $j]       ;# less efficient example

 

The Windows NT/Windows 2000 Tk console does not perform very well when large text strings are displayed.  You may find it preferable to print results by separate rows for large output sets, or to write large output results to a file.  Another alternative to the Windows Tk console, is to use tclsh83.exe from a command window.

 

Tcl maintains an internal binary representation for variable values, and computes a string representation for a variable value only when needed.   If your logic is inconsistent and sometimes treats a variable as a string, and sometimes treats it as a list of numbers, you can cause inefficient “shimmering” of the internal representation.  For best efficiency use list oriented commands to manipulate your vector and matrix variables, and don’t mix string oriented commands.  For example:

 

      lappend m $newvalue      ;# good – lappend is a list oriented procedure

      append m " $newvalue"    ;# bad, this causes conversion to a string

 

The last tip is that it is very easy to use the built-in time command to analyze actual performance of your code. 

 

A PCA Example

 

The package contains a worked Principle Components Analysis problem based on Section 6.5 of the SEMATECH/NIST Statistics Handbook, http://www.itl.nist.gov/div898/handbook.

 

See the file NIST.tcl.

Reference

 

Alphabetical Procedure Table

 

Procedure Name(s)

Description

demote, demote_br

Demote an Nx1 or 1xN matrix to a vector[N].  Demote a vector[1] to a scalar.  Call twice to demote a 1x1 matrix to scalar.

dim, dim_br

Return the dimension of the argument,  and to some degree verify a proper format.

dotprod, dotprod_br

Dot Product = sum over i, Ai * Bi

Can work columns or rows in matrices because indexing increments are optional arguments.

join_cols, join_cols_br

Combine vector or matrices as added columns.

join_rows, join_rows_br

Combine vector or matrices as added rows.

lassign, lassign_br

Replace a single value in a Tcl list.

madd

Computes a new matrix or vector from the addition of corresponding elements in two operands.

madjust

Apply a scale factor and offset to the operand’s elements.

mat_binary_op, mat_binary_op_br

Perform binary operations such as addition on corresponding elements of vectors or matrices.

mat_unary_op, mat_unary_op_br

Perform unary operations on elements like scaling.

mathprec

Returns the smallest number epsilon, such that 1+epsilon > 1.

Also reports on the machine radix, digits, and rounding behavior

mcols, mcols_br

Return the number of columns in a matrix or vector.  You can use mrows and mcols to keep your software isolated from the details of the data representation.

mdiag

Creates a diagonal matrix from a vector, an Nx1 matrix, or a 1XN matrix.

mdingdong

Create the Ding Dong test matrix, a Cauchy matrix that is represented inexactly in the machine, but very stable for inversion by elimination methods.

mdiv

Computes a new matrix or vector from the division of corresponding elements in two operands.

mevsvd, mevsvd_br

Solve for the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of a real symmetric matrix by singular value decomposition.

mhilbert

Create the Hilbert test matrix which is notorious for being  ill conditioned for eigenvector/eigenvalue solutions.

mident

Create an identity matrix of order N.

mlssvd

Linear least squares solution for over-determined linear equations using singular value decomposition.

mmult, mmult_br

Ordinary matrix multiplication.

mnorms, mnorms_br

Compute the means and standard deviations of each column.

mnormalize, mnormalize_br

Normalize each column by subtracting the corresponding mean and then dividing by the corresponding standard deviation.

moffset

Add a constant to the elements of an operand.

mprod

Computes a new matrix or vector from the product of corresponding elements in two operands.

mrange, mrange_br

Return a subset of selected columns, selected rows as a new matrix.  Also can be used to reverse the ordering when the start index > end index.

mround, mround_br

Round off elements in a matrix if they are close to integers.

mrows, mrows_br

Return the number of rows in a matrix or vector.  You can use mrows and mcols to keep your software isolated from the details of the data representation.

mscale

Multiply each element in an operand by a factor.

msolve, msolve_br

Solve the matrix problem Ax = p for x, where p may be multiple columns.  When p is the identity matrix, the solution x, is the inverse of A.  Uses Gauss elimination with partial pivoting.

msub

Computes a new matrix or vector from the subtraction of corresponding elements in two operands.

msum, msum_br

Compute the sums of each column, returning a vector or scalar result.  Call twice to get the total sum of columns and rows (set total [msum [msum $a]]).

msvd

Perform the Singular Value Decomposition of a matrix.

promote, promote_br

Promote a scalar or vector to an array.  Vector[N] is promoted to an Nx1 array.

show, show_br

Return a formatted string representation for an operand.  Options allow for specify the format of numbers, and the strings used to separate column and row elements.

transpose, transpose_br

Performs the matrix transpose, exchanging [i,j] with [j,i].  A vector is promoted to a 1xN array by transpose.

vdiag, vdiag_br

Create a vector from the diagonal elements of a matrix.

vtrim, vtrim_br

For a vector or matrix operand, just return the actual data elements by trimming away the dimension and size data in the front

 

 

demote x

demote_br name_x_in {name_out {}}

 

Demote an Nx1 or 1xN matrix to a vector[n].  Demote a vector[1] to a scalar.  Call twice to demote a 1x1 matrix to scalar.  For the _br procedure, the default output destination is to overwrite the input.

 

dim x

dim_br name_x

 

Return the dimension of the argument,  and to some degree verify a proper format.  Returns 0 for a scalar, 1 for a vector, 2 for a matrix, and an empty string, {}, for an empty input value.  Most improper formats will result in an error.

dotprod a b {N {}} {a0index 3} {b0index 3} {ainc 1} {binc 1}

dotprod_br a_name b_name {N {}} {a0index 3} {b0index 3} {ainc 1} {binc 1}

Perform the dot product of two operands, a and b, returning a scalar result.  The default arguments will correctly process vector and conformable 1xN or Nx1 matrices.  The argument N is the number of element pairs to multiply when computing the sum of pair products.  The a0index and b0index optional arguments are the offset of the first element in the a and b operands, respectively.  The ainc and binc optional arguments are the index increment values to be added to the indexes into a and b to obtain subsequent elements.

 

join_cols a b

join_cols_br {a_in b_in {c_out {}}

Combine vector or matrices as added columns, returning a matrix result.  The arguments must have the same number of rows.  The default output for the join_cols_br call is to overwrite the a input.

 

join_rows a b

join_rows_br {a_in b_in {c_out {}}

Combine vector or matrices as added rows, returning a matrix result.  The arguments must have the same number of columns.  The default output for the join_rows_br call is to overwrite the a input.

lassign list index value

lassign_br listname index value

Replace a single element in a Tcl list.  There is conditional logic in the package so that the lassign_br could be replaced by a C code version that would be able to update the list directly without copying the data the way lreplace does.

madd a b

This procedure uses mat_binary_op to return a matrix or vector result from the addition of corresponding elements in two operands.

madjust a scale offset

This procedure uses mat_unary_op to return a matrix or vector where the elements have been multiplied by a common factor, scale, and then the offset value has been added.

 

mat_binary_op a b {op +}

mat_binary_op_br a_in b_in op {c_out {}}

This procedure is used to execute binary operations such as addition on corresponding elements of vector or matrix operands.  The default output for the _br call is to overwrite the a input.

mathprec {puts puts}

Returns the smallest number epsilon, such that 1+epsilon > 1.  Also reports on the machine radix, digits, and rounding behavior, by using $puts as a command with a single string argument, of the format “radix=2.0 digits=53 epsilon=2.22044604925e-016 method=truncation”.  The default value of the puts argument causes the string to be printed at the console.

mcols m

mcols_br m_name

Return the number of columns in a matrix or vector.  You can use mrows and mcols to keep your software isolated from the details of the data representation.

 

mdiag v

Creates a diagonal matrix from a vector, an Nx1 matrix, or a 1xN matrix.

mdingdong N

Create the Ding Dong test matrix of size NxN.  The matrix is a Cauchy matrix that is represented inexactly in the machine, but very stable for inversion by elimination methods.  Created by Dr. F. N. Ris (Nash, 1979).

mdiv a b

Uses mat_binary_op to compute a new matrix or vector from the division of corresponding elements in two operands. 

mevsvd A {epsilon 2.3e-16}

mevsvd_br A_in_out evals_out {epsilon 2.3e-16}

Solve for the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of a real symmetric matrix by singular value decomposition.  The eigenvectors of the solution are returned as the columns of A.  The epsilon argument is expected to be the value returned by the mathprec procedure for your platform.

mhilbert N

Create the Hilbert test matrix which is notorious for being  ill conditioned for eigenvector/eigenvalue solutions. (Nash, 1979)

mident N

Create an identity matrix of order N.

mlssvd A y {q 0.0} {puts puts} {epsilon 2.3e-16}

Solve the linear least squares solution for over-determined linear equations using singular value decomposition.  Solves the problem A[m,n]x[n] ~ y[m] for x[n] where each row of A is a set of dependent variable values, x[n] is the vector of independent variables, and y[m] is the set of dependent values such as measured outcome values.  The first column of A is usually all ones to compute a constant term in the regression equation.  The value q is specified such that singular values less than q are treated as zero.  Typically a judgment is made as to what variation is significant, and what is just noise.  The significance level varies by application.  For example, a small value of q might be appropriate to detect a new planet from orbital data, whereas larger values would be used to regress socio-economic statistics.  The default value of the puts argument causes the singular values to be printed at the console after the matrix is factored.  The epsilon argument is expected to be the result of the mathprec procedure for your platform.

mmult A B

mmult_br name_A name_B C_out

Ordinary matrix multiplication, A[p,q] x B[q,r] = C[p,r].  Vector arguments are  promoted to Nx1 arrays, so chances are if you are using one as a left operand you probably intend to use the transpose of it (1xN), which is easily done using the transpose procedure.  The mmult procedure returns the value of the matrix product.  The mmult_br procedure writes the matrix product into the variable whose name is C_out.  The variable name C_out should specify a different variable than either of the input variables specified by name_A or name_B.

mnorms a

mnorms_br name_a means_out sigmas_out

Compute the means and standard deviations of each column of the input matrix.  Vector results are returned.  If the number of rows is less than 2, the standard deviations cannot be calculated and an error is returned.

mnormalize a means sigmas

mnormalize_br name_a means_in sigmas_in {c_out {}}

Normalize each column of a matrix by subtracting the corresponding mean and then dividing by the corresponding standard deviation.  The default output matrix for mnormalize_br is to overwrite the input matrix specified by name_a.

moffset a delta

Uses mat_unary_op to add a scalar constant to the elements of an operand.  The modified operand is the returned result.

mprod a b

Uses mat_binary_op to compute a new matrix or vector from the multiplicative product of corresponding elements in two operands.

mrange m col_start col_last {row_start 0} {row_last end}

mrange_br name_m_in c_out col_start col_last {row_start 0} {row_last end}

Returns a subset of the selected columns and selected rows of a matrix as a new matrix.  Column and row indexing begin with 0.  The token end may be used to specify the last row or column.  The default values for row selection will return all rows.  The rows and columns are read and copied from the input matrix in the order of start to last.  The selection result includes rows and columns with index values equal to the start indexes and proceeds to the last indexes, including all rows and columns with indexes between the start and last values and equal to the start and last values.  If the start index is less than the last index for row or column selection, the result matrix is created with the row or columns in reverse order.  This is a feature, not a bug. 

% set m {2 2 3 1 2 3 4 5 6}

% show $m

1 2 3

4 5 6

% show [mrange $m 0 1]

1 2

4 5

% show [mrange $m end 0]

3 2 1

6 5 4

% show [mrange $m 1 1 0 0]

2

mround a {epsilon 1.0e-8}

Uses mat_unary_op to round-off to the nearest integer the elements of a matrix or vector which are within epsilon of an integer value.

% show $m %12.4g

           1   1.388e-016   8.327e-017  -2.776e-017

  1.388e-016            1  -5.551e-017   -1.11e-016

  8.327e-017  -5.551e-017            1  -5.551e-017

 -2.776e-017   -1.11e-016  -5.551e-017            1

% show [mround $m]

1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

0.0 1.0 0.0 0.0

0.0 0.0 1.0 0.0

0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0

mrows m

mrows_br m_name

Return the number of rows in a matrix or vector.  You can use mrows and mcols to keep your software isolated from the details of the data representation.

mscale a scalefactor

Uses mat_unary_op to multiply each element in a matrix or vector operand, a, by the scalar scalefactor.

msolve A p

msolve_br Ap_in {tolerance 2.3e-16}

Solves a system of linear equations, Ax = p, for x, by brute force application of Gauss elimination with partial pivoting.  When p is the identity matrix, the solution x, is the inverse of matrix A.The msolve_br procedure accepts as input the columnwise concatenation of A and p, and overwrites the p columns with the solution columns x.   The msolve procedure accepts A and p as separate arguments, and returns the solution data directly.  The epsilon argument is expected to be the result of the mathprec procedure for your platform.

msub a b

Uses mat_binary_op to compute a new matrix or vector from the subtraction of corresponding elements in two operands.

msum a

msum_br name_a sums_out

Compute the sums of each column of a matrix or vector, returning a vector or scalar result.  Call twice to get the total sum of columns and rows (set total [msum [msum $a]]).

msvd a

msvd_br name_a_in_U_out S_out V_out {epsilon 2.3e-16}

Perform the Singular Value Decomposition of a matrix.

This factors matrix A into (U)(S)(Vtrans) where

    A[m,n] is the original matrix

    U[m,n] has orthogonal columns (Ut)(U) =   (1(k)

       and multiplies to an identity matrix     ...

       supplemented with zeroes if needed        0(n-k))

    V[n,n] is orthogonal   (V)(Vtran) = [mident $n]

       V contains the eigenvectors aka the principal components

    S is diagonal with the positive singular values of A

       Square S and divide by (m-1) to get the principal component

       eigenvalues.

   

    A[m,n]V[n,n] = B[m,n]  transforms A to orthogonal columns, B

    B[m,n] = U[m,n]S[n,n] 

   

The msvd procedure outputs formatted results to the console.  The msvd_br procedure overwrites the input matrix a with the U result matrix.  The epsilon argument is expected to be the result of the mathprec procedure for your platform.

mat_unary_op a op

mat_unary_op_br name_a op {name_c_out {}}

Perform unary operations on operand elements like scaling.  The default output of the mat_unary_op_br procedure is to overwrite the input specified by name_a.  The logic sweeps through the matrix or vector, and evaluates the concatenation of $op with the operand element.  For example, if the value of op is “expr 0.5 *” the result would be to multiply each element by 0.5.  You can define your own procedures, and pass the procedure name as the op argument.

promote x

promote_br name_x {name_out {}}

Promote a scalar or vector to an array.  Vector[N] is promoted to an Nx1 array.  Calling promote with a matrix argument is all right; the result is the matrix unchanged.  The default output of promote_br is to overwrite the input.

show x {format {}} {col_join { }} {row_join \n}}

show_br name_in {name_out {}} {format {}} {col_join { }} {row_join \n}

Return a formatted string representation for an operand.   Options allow for specify the format of numbers, and the strings used to separate column and row elements.  The optional format argument is a specification string which is applied to convert each element using the Tcl format command.  The format command is very is similar to the C code sprintf command.  

 

set m {2 2 3 1 2 3 4 5 6}

% show $m %6.2f

  1.00   2.00   3.00

  4.00   5.00   6.00

% show $m {} , \;

1,2,3;4,5,6

transpose x

transpose_br name_x {name_out {}}

Performs the matrix transpose, exchanging [i,j] with [j,i].  A vector is promoted to a 1xN array by transpose.  The default output of the transpose_br procedure is to overwrite the input data named by name_x.

vdiag m

vdiag_br m_name_in v_out

Create a vector from the diagonal elements of a matrix.

vtrim x

vtrim_br name_x {name_out {}}

For a vector or matrix operand, just return the actual data elements by trimming away the dimension and size data in the front of the underlying Tcl list representation.  The default output of the vtrim_br procedure is to overwrite the input data named by name_x.

About the Author

This package has been developed by Edward C. Hume, III PhD.  Dr. Hume has been interested in numerical methods since the early 1980’s when his doctoral research at MIT involved a comparison of Finite Element and Boundary Element methods for moving boundary problems.  In recent years he has been applying univariate and multivariate Statistical Process Control techniques in his consulting work.  Dr. Hume is the founder of Hume Integration Services, a software product and consulting company, with a focus on Computer Integrated Manufacturing in the Semiconductor and Electronics industries.

 

Hume Integration's flagship product is the Distributed Message Hub (DMH) Application Development Package, a cohesive and synergistic set of tools that extends the Tcl/Tk programming environment. The package includes an in-memory SQL database that has subscription capability, comprehensive support for equipment interfaces using SECS, serial, or network protocols, and high-level facilities for interprocess communication. Applications can easily share data and logic by exchanging Tcl and SQL messages which are efficiently processed by the extended interpreter. This toolset is offered for Windows 2000/NT and major POSIX platforms including HP-UX, Linux, AIX, and SOLARIS. The toolset is in 7x24 use in dozens of factories located in the United States, Malaysia, Korea, Japan, China, Hong Kong, Singapore, Taiwan, Mexico, France, and Scotland.  Feel free to visit our website at http://www.hume.com.

 

References

 

The more sophisticated algorithms in this package were adapted from Nash, 1979.

 

Compact Numerical Methods for Computers: Linear Algebra and Function Minimisation by J. C. Nash, John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1979.

License Terms

 

The La package software is being distributed under terms and conditions similar to Tcl/Tk.  The author is providing the package software to the Tcl community as a returned favor for the value of packages received over the years.

 

The La package software is copyrighted by Hume Integration Services. The following terms apply to all files associated with the software unless explicitly disclaimed in individual files.

 

The authors hereby grant permission to use, copy, modify, distribute, and license this software and its documentation for any purpose, provided that existing copyright notices are retained in all copies and that this notice is included verbatim in any distributions. No written agreement, license, or royalty fee is required for any of the authorized uses. Modifications to this software may be copyrighted by their authors and need not follow the licensing terms described here, provided that the new terms are clearly indicated on the first page of each file where they apply.

 

IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR DISTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE TO ANY PARTY FOR DIRECT, INDIRECT, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES ARISING OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, ITS DOCUMENTATION, OR ANY DERIVATIVES THEREOF, EVEN IF THE AUTHORS HAVE BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

 

THE AUTHORS AND DISTRIBUTORS SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIM ANY WARRANTIES,INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, AND NON-INFRINGEMENT.  THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED ON AN "AS IS" BASIS, AND THE AUTHORS AND DISTRIBUTORS HAVE NO OBLIGATION TO PROVIDE MAINTENANCE, SUPPORT, UPDATES, ENHANCEMENTS, OR MODIFICATIONS.

 

GOVERNMENT USE: If you are acquiring this software on behalf of the U.S. government, the Government shall have only "Restricted Rights" in the software and related documentation as defined in the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FARs) in Clause 52.227.19 (c) (2).  If you are acquiring the software on behalf of the Department of Defense, the software shall be classified as "Commercial Computer Software" and the Government shall have only "Restricted Rights" as defined in Clause 252.227-7013 (c) (1) of DFARs.  Notwithstanding the foregoing, the authors grant the U.S. Government and others acting in its behalf permission to use and distribute the software in accordance with the terms specified in this license.

 

Document Version

Date of last revsion $Date: 2001/07/12 23:59:51 $.